Environmental Performance

Environmental Performance


Environmental Sustainability is in Our Nature


FPAC members are global leaders in producing sustainable forest products under strict environmental rules. In fact, Canada's forestry regulations and laws were cited in a study from Yale University as being among the most stringent in the world.1 Against this tough regulatory backdrop, FPAC members continued to make good progress on environmental performance in. FPAC members maintained their strong commitment to sustainable forest management, fighting climate change, conserving water, reducing air pollution and reusing fibre.

1 Global Environmental Forest Policies: Canada as a Constant Case Comparison of Select Forest Practice Regulations, Cashore, Benjamin. Yale University, 2004.

Managing Forests Sustainably

Managing Forests Sustainably

FPAC members have all the forestlands they manage independently certified to one of three certification systems in use in Canada: Canadian Standards Association, the Forest Stewardship Council, or the Sustainable Forestry Initiative standards. Since 2002, third-party certification has been a condition of FPAC membership.

Globally, Canada accounts for over 42 percent of all certified forests, while FPAC members alone are responsible for 26 percent of all global certified forests. FPAC members are also working to enhance certification standards. Signing and implementing the Canadian Boreal Forest Agreement signalled a commitment to developing world-leading forest management practices.

Vision2020: Environmental Performance

Vision 2020 uses an index of 12 environmental performance indicators to measure the sector’s environmental footprint. Here are the performance results between 2010 to 2012.

 

In 2010-2012, the reduction in waste to landfill, at 31%, was the most significant decrease. Canada has bolstered its position as a global leader in this area with 98% of wood residue now being used for either energy generation or composting. More than 66% of mills’ waste water sediment is being used for either energy generation, composting or land application. The recycling rate also improved by another 4%. Canada has one of the highest recovery rates of waste paper and packaging in the world at 73%, significantly better than the international average of 56% and higher than Europe, Japan, China and the United States. Energy use decreased by 8%. For example, the sector continued to invest in energy reduction projects including the installation of energy-efficient equipment to improve mills’ competitiveness and increase the production of green energy. This has also served to improve the quality of air emissions with a reduction in particulate matter (PM; 11%), sulphur oxide (SOx; 6%) and nitrous oxide (NOx; 11%). The sector’s water use and water quality (or biological oxygen demand (BOD)) have decreased slightly since 2010 down by 3% respectively. Companies are currently implementing projects that will improve water quality emissions and further reduce water use but more could be done if regulatory regimes were improved.